“Vedi Napoli e poi muori”

I’ve lived in Napoli since January 2018. I’ve tried to explore as much of the city as possible, but I think you could live a lifetime here and never see it all. You can read my love letter here.

It goes without saying that the food is unreal. There’s a list of favoured places here. I’ve put on a few pounds since I moved here, any regrets? Nope.

The quote is “See Naples and die” so I’ve compiled a few places that I love.

 

Views

It is essential that you view Napoli from a good vantage point. Here are a few good places.

  • Certosa di San Martino: 6
  • Castel Sant Elmo: 5
  • Scale del Petraio: Free
  • Parco Floridiana: Free
  • Parco Virgiliano: Free
  • Capodimonte: Free
  • Lungomare

 

Churches & Resting Places

The Duomo – A must see. Try to go during a service, but respect the silence. You can’t walk around the outside of the Duomo, you can only see the facade. Visit the crypt under the altar. 

Gesu Nuovo – Don’t judge a book by its cover. A behemoth of a church, brutal from the outside, opulent as anything on the inside. 

Santa Chiara – Modern church built within the ruins of an ancient church. Beautiful cloisters with original Majolica tiles and access to the remains of a Roman Bath.  

Sansevero Capella – The most incredible sculptures you’ll ever see. Book tickets in advance to beat the queues. 

Cimitero delle Fontanelle – Bones. Piles upon piles of bones. Read the history before visiting. 

San Gaudioso Catacombs – You must do the guided tour, the story of the preparation of the bodies is pretty intense. 

 

Piazzas

Plebiscito – a beautiful, expansive Piazza, the church in the centre of the curved columns is stunning.

San Domenico Maggiore and Piazetta Nilo – where the students hang out. Lots of bars and places to sit and take a pause.

Piazza Bellini – another favourite with students.

 

Markets

Porta Nolana Market – vibrant food market!

Pignasecca Market – fruit, fish, clothes… it’s full of hustle and bustle. 

 

Instagram Spots

Doll Hospital 

Santi Marcellino e Festo 

Palazzo della Borsa 

Palazzo dello Spagnuolo 

Metro stations!

 

Museums and Buildings

MANN – Archeological Museum, lots to see. 

Madre – Modern Art Museum, can easily be seen in around 1.5 hours, but worth a trip. 

San Carlo – If you can’t see a show here, make sure you do one of the guided tours. It’s the oldest theatre in the world.

Palazzo Reale – The staircase in the Royal Palace is incredible, as is the private theatre. 

Castel del’Ovo – The ‘Egg Castle’ in the sea is a beautiful 

 

Napoli Tips

  • Scooters – Don’t jump out of the way of scooters. They’ll go around you. 
  • Crossing the road – You must be brave and simply walk out on the road, otherwise you’ll be standing there forever. 
  • Metro – It’s useful for long distances, but it’s often quicker to walk. 
  • Coffee – At the bar is cheaper than at the table. Amaro = no sugar. The cup will be v hot. 
  • Taxis – They are incredibly expensive. Always check the price against the chart on the back of the Driver’s chair. 
  • Language – A little ‘grazie’, ‘buongiorno’ and ‘buonasera’ will get you a long way. Neapolitans are incredibly friendly and fiercely proud of their culture. 

Look at Lucca

Lucca was an unexpected gem on our trip to Italy. A walled city in Tuscany, a short train journey from Pisa and Florence, full of charm and history. We jumped on two wheels (sans motor) and started exploring.

Our first stop was for a Marmalade Cornetto and Macchiato on the corner of the Piazza Napoleone en route to pick up some lunch supplies. I bumbled through ordering focaccia before a cycle around the 4.2km city walls. Cycling within the walls is a bit tricky due to pedestrians, Vespas and small dogs, so watch out!

Lucca isn’t very big, it’s a chilled out city with peaceful piazzas and shaded alleyways. We cycled around the walls for around 2 hours, before despatching our bikes and making our way to our hotel. We didn’t stay within the walls, a short ten-minute walk in a stunning small hotel, complete with grand bed, balcony and ornate cornicing.

We ventured back into the city walls where we enjoyed Aperitivo in the Piazza dell’Antiteatro, before having dinner at the Local Food Market in a beautiful courtyard. The food was spectacular, local cheeses and honey, pasta, followed by perfect pannacotta.

The next day we climbed the Torre Guinigi to take in the beautiful red roofs and Tuscan hills in the distance.

We were there for only one night and two days, and I’m looking forward to returning at some point in the future.